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2023 BMW S 1000 RR Updated

The new S 1000 RR will adopt many of the M 1000 RR’s features including aerodynamic winglets.

The new S 1000 RR will adopt many of the M 1000 RR’s features including aerodynamic winglets. (BMW/)

When BMW revealed its list of updated color options and minor upgrades for carryover 2023 models, the S 1000 RR superbike was notably missing from the list, indicating that it’s getting bigger changes in the coming year. Now we’ve got our hands on the upgraded bike’s specifications, which reveal subtle but significant revisions.

The 2023 S 1000 RR was recently type-approved in Europe and gets a bunch of improvements. These largely take cues from the more expensive M 1000 RR homologation special, and will give a taste of that bike to the masses at a more affordable price.

The first noteworthy upgrade is to the engine and power output. The 2022 S 1000 RR makes a claimed 204 hp in European trim, hitting that mark at 13,500 rpm, while the M 1000 RR is good for 209 hp at 14,500 rpm. The US models are slightly different, with both the S and M bikes managing 202.5 hp at 13,000 rpm. Documentation shows that the 2023 S 1000 RR, in Europe at least, will split the power difference between the current S 1000 RR and M 1000 RR with a claimed 206.5 hp at 13,750 rpm. The essence of the ShiftCam four-cylinder engine, with its unique variable valve timing and lift system, is believed to be unchanged; improvements are expected to come from minor internal and electronic tweaks rather than a wholesale redesign.

Updates to the S 1000 RR’s engine will increase power slightly from 204 to 206 hp.

Updates to the S 1000 RR’s engine will increase power slightly from 204 to 206 hp. (BMW/)

Whether the US-spec bikes get the same small power increase is yet to be seen. Even without it, the 2023 S 1000 RR will feel quicker than the current bike because it is set to inherit the same lower final-drive ratio used on the M 1000 RR. By using a 46-tooth rear sprocket instead of the standard S 1000 RR’s 45-tooth version, the M bike’s gearing is reduced to boost its acceleration. We know the same also applies to the 2023 S 1000 RR, as its listed top speed in European form is reduced from 190 mph to 188 mph despite its additional power. Additionally, its wheelbase increases from 56.7 inches to 57.4 inches, the same as the M 1000 RR. On the M 1000 RR, the larger sprocket is accompanied by a longer chain, allowing the rear wheel to be moved farther back in its adjusters to increase the wheelbase; the 2023 S 1000 RR is clearly following suit.

We believe that smaller plastic winglets will be added to the S 1000 RR’s bodywork, getting passed down from the M 1000 RR.

We believe that smaller plastic winglets will be added to the S 1000 RR’s bodywork, getting passed down from the M 1000 RR. (BMW/)

There’s no change in the 2023 S 1000 RR’s weight, which remains at 434 pounds including a full tank of fuel, so in that respect the carbon-clad, 423-pound M version will retain an edge. However, the 2023 S 1000 RR will incorporate aerodynamic lessons learned from the M version, gaining winglets on the nose in keeping with the current superbike trends. On the M 1000 RR, the wings add a claimed 35.9 pounds of downforce at 189 mph. The 2023 S 1000 RR’s wings are likely to be a bit smaller, and plastic rather than carbon fiber, reducing the overall level of downforce. They’ll still have a genuine impact on the bike’s stability.

The new S 1000 RR’s bodywork will be slightly revised to set it apart from the 2022 model pictured here.

The new S 1000 RR’s bodywork will be slightly revised to set it apart from the 2022 model pictured here. (BMW/)

Visually, the addition of the winglets is likely to be the biggest differentiator between the 2022 and 2023 S 1000 RRs. Some sources say that the new bike also has a subtle reworking of the body panels, particularly around the nose. The overall length, width, and height are unchanged, suggesting body changes will only be minimal, but the updates along with fresh paint schemes  should be enough to make sure you don’t mistake the new model for the old one. BMW is sure to unveil the bike within the next month or two, though it’s expected to be early 2023 before revised S 1000 RRs start to reach dealers.

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