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2022 Triumph Street Twin

What a gem: the Street Twin’s Cobalt Blue brings the price up to $9,995.

What a gem: the Street Twin’s Cobalt Blue brings the price up to $9,995. (Triumph/)

Ups

  • Lovely and approachable 270-degree crank parallel-twin engine
  • Predictable handling via a well-developed, stable chassis
  • Thick, comfortable seat
  • Nice attention to detail with aluminum accents

Downs

  • Annoying gas cap and delay in fuel level display after fill-up
  • For the price you’d think the Street Twin would have full LED lighting
  • Engine heat and vibration

Verdict

If a motorcycle with a sensible and friendly engine, predictable handling, comfortable seating, and classic looks checks all the right boxes for you, and you don’t mind paying a somewhat premium price, then the Triumph Street Twin is a great option.

Overview

The Street Twin is one of the top-selling modern classics in Triumph’s lineup. Introduced in 2016, the bike pairs classic styling with an engine that is agreeable to a wide variety of riders. Significant updates were made in 2019, while more changes were made this year to improve its engine and further refine comfort and quality. These changes go a step further in helping the bike attract a widespread following.

Currently, Triumph uses “Street” in its model names to indicate that a lower-displacement engine is used than in the higher-powered “Speed” models (though we may see a change in Triumph’s naming conventions in 2023). The Street Twin is powered by Triumph’s 900cc parallel-twin engine. A 270-degree firing order and ample low- to midrange torque give this engine an engaging character. Pair that with the bike’s classic design and excellent fit and finish for a sensible, if somewhat pricey, Street Twin.

The Street Twin EC1 Special Edition gives a nod to the moto culture of London’s East End.

The Street Twin EC1 Special Edition gives a nod to the moto culture of London’s East End. (Triumph/)

Updates for 2022

The Street Twin’s engine is now Euro 5 compliant. Other updates include a thicker foam seat, new cast wheels with machine detailing, new bodywork, and brushed aluminum detailing.

Pricing and Variants

The 2022 Street Twin’s price ranges from $9,695 to $9,995, depending on color; choices are Jet Black, Cobalt Blue, or Matte Ironstone. Anglophiles will be stoked; the Twin also comes in the EC1 special edition ($10,445). The name comes from the custom moto culture in London, specifically within the historic district of London, the postal code for which is EC1.

Competition

There are many manufacturers riding the retro-style wave. Shoppers have a mix of modern and retro-styled bikes to look at, including the Honda CB650R, Royal Enfield INT650, Suzuki SV650, Moto Guzzi V7, Yamaha XSR700, Kawasaki W800, or the new-for-2022 Z650RS.

The negative space between the parallel twin and tubular steel frame is quite attractive.

The negative space between the parallel twin and tubular steel frame is quite attractive. (Triumph/)

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

A 900cc parallel twin (now Euro 5 compliant) is as easily controlled as it is fantastically engaging. There’s a ride-by-wire throttle for precise response and a five-speed gearbox with a wet, multiplate, and torque-assist clutch for smooth gear changes. The 270-degree crank delivers loads of character and the engine’s power is concentrated in the low to mid-rpm range. In fact, over 50 pound-feet of torque is delivered between 2,750 and 6,000 rpm as indicated on its dyno chart. Overall, the engine produces 60.1 hp at 6,880 rpm and 55.6 pound-feet of torque at 3,700 rpm. This is plenty to carry the bike well through twists and turns and is very user-friendly from stoplight to stoplight.

Nothing is perfect, though, and there are a couple of complaints with this engine. First, engine heat begins to toast the rider’s right shin after about 40 minutes of riding. Second, vibrations tend to creep into the pegs at around 5,500 rpm. Fortunately, the vibration doesn’t make its way into the handlebar.

A single 310mm disc and four-piston caliper at the front slow the Twin down.

A single 310mm disc and four-piston caliper at the front slow the Twin down. (Triumph/)

Handling

Bring on miles of winding roads. The Street Twin tackles any type of curved road, switchbacks or sweepers alike, with confidence. The rider can pick a line and stay there thanks to the bike’s predictable handling and stable double-cradle steel-tube frame.

KYB suspension at both ends plays a supporting role in the bike’s good backroad manners. The 41mm fork and dual shocks keep the bike settled in the turns, and both ends are planted. That said, the shocks’ compression setting is slightly stiff and rebound is quick, causing a slight bucking on sharp bumps. Both ends have a moderate 4.7 inches of travel.

Brakes

No brand loyalty when it comes to brake calipers. The Twin has Brembo and Nissin calipers front and rear, respectively, and the Brembo caliper grabs the 310mm disc with a determined bite. Although the Nissin/255mm rear disc combo gets the job done, more pressure must be applied to the rear brake pedal than anticipated to get the same level of performance.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

The Street Twin gets an average of 50.7 mpg.

A one-piece bench seat is thick and comfortable for extended periods of time.

A one-piece bench seat is thick and comfortable for extended periods of time. (Triumph/)

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

The Triumph’s well-padded single-piece seat is nice on the glutes, comfortable for many hours of riding with ample room to adjust and shift as needed. Because there is so much real estate here, two-up riding is very manageable.

The handlebar places the rider in an upright riding position; the pegs, which made for a slightly cramped ride for our 6-foot-tall rider, offer a relaxed bend at the knee for most folks. Seat height is an accessible 30.1 inches.

Electronics

The Street Twin is retro in style but blends in some modern tech, coming standard with switchable traction control, ABS, two ride modes (Road and Rain), an underseat USB charging socket, and an immobilizer-equipped key.

An analog speedometer with an integrated LCD screen provides all relevant information. Lighting is a combination of halogen (front) and LED (rear), though considering the price of this bike, it would be nice to have the best lighting at both ends.

A halogen headlight certainly does keep it old school. LED lighting is found on the back, though, so it would be nice to have LED at the front as well.

A halogen headlight certainly does keep it old school. LED lighting is found on the back, though, so it would be nice to have LED at the front as well. (Triumph/)

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

Triumph motorcycles come with a two-year unlimited-mileage warranty.

Quality

Triumphs gush with quality nowadays. Engines are more reliable, and there’s great attention to detail with brushed aluminum accents throughout. Now, if only some of the electronics could be updated…

2022 Triumph Street Twin Claimed Specifications

MSRP: $9,695–$9,995 / $10,445 (EC1 Special Edition)
Engine: 900cc, SOHC, liquid-cooled parallel twin; 8 valves
Bore x Stroke: 84.6 x 80.0mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 5-speed/chain
Cycle World Measured Horsepower: 60.1 hp @ 6,880 rpm
Cycle World Measured Torque: 55.6 lb.-ft. @ 3,700 rpm
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection, ride-by-wire
Clutch: Wet, multiplate torque assist clutch
Engine Management/Ignition: N/A
Frame: Tubular steel w/ twin cradles
Front Suspension: 41mm KYB fork, nonadjustable w/ cartridge damping; 4.7 in. travel
Rear Suspension: KYB dual shocks, preload adjustable; 4.7 in. travel
Front Brake: 4-piston caliper, full-floating 310mm discs w/ ABS
Rear Brake: 2-piston caliper, 255mm disc w/ ABS
Wheels, Front/Rear: Spoked cast aluminum; 18 x 2.75 in. / 17 x 4.25 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: 100/90-18 / 150/70-17
Rake/Trail: 25.1º/4.0 in.
Wheelbase: 57.1 in.
Ground Clearance: N/A
Seat Height: 30.1 in.
Fuel Capacity: 3.2 gal.
Cycle World Measured Wet Weight: 477 lb.
Contact: triumphmotorcycles.com

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